Watch News High School Sport Today - HIGHSCORE


Tyriek Weeks named 2020-21 HIGHSCORE Rhode Island High School Basketball Player of the Year - HIGHSCORE
Tyriek Weeks named 2020-21 MaxPreps Rhode Island High School Basketball Player of the Year
Each year since 2006, MaxPreps has recognized outstanding performers in high school basketball. America's source for high school sports continues the tradition to close out the 2020-21 season by naming the top player in each state. Selections are based on team success and individual excellence, in addition to local and state accolades.

Tyriek Weeks of Pilgrim (Warwick) is the 2020-21 Rhode Island High School Basketball Player of the Year. The 6-foot-5, 170-pound senior led the Patriots to a 8-2 record en route to the Division 2 state quarterfinals.

Weeks recorded a double-double in every game during his two years at Pilgrim, averaging 20.4 points, 17.4 rebounds and five blocked shots per outing this season.

He surpassed the 1,000-point milestone in the final game of the season, finishing with 23 points in a loss to Burrillville (Harrisville).

Weeks is regarded as the state's top prospect with offers from Massachusetts and Towson.

Each state's MaxPreps Player of the Year will be considered for inclusion in the MaxPreps All-America Team, which is scheduled to be released April 13.
2020-21 high school volleyball state champions - HIGHSCORE
2020-21 high school volleyball state champions
MaxPreps is your home for high school girls volleyball state playoff coverage.

The 2020-21 school year has been unprecedented with many states forging ahead with competition while others have remained on the sideline due to the COVID-19 pandemic. MaxPreps has covered volleyball from the preseason and will stay with it through the final tournament sometime next spring. Check back as we update the champions as their seasons progress.

Here is a list of the state champions in each division from across America. Click here to find tournaments in your state.
Fayetteville celebrates its Arkansas 6A title.
Photo by Justin Miller
Fayetteville celebrates its Arkansas 6A title.
Girls volleyball state champions

Alabama

7A — Hoover def. Spain Park (Hoover), 3-0
6A — Mountain Brook (Birmingham) def. Hartselle, 3-0
5A — Bayside Academy (Daphne) def. West Point (Cullman), 3-0
4A — Montgomery Academy (Montgomery) def. Curry (Jasper), 3-1
3A — Trinity Presbyterian (Montgomery) def. Plainview (Rainsville), 3-0
2A — Addison def. Long (Skipperville), 3-1
1A — Bayshore Christian (Fairhope) def. Donoho (Anniston,), 3-1
AISA A — Abbeville Christian Academy (Abbeville) def. Jackson Academy (Jackson), 3-1
AISA AA — Edgewood Academy (Elmore) def. Chambers Academy (LaFayette), 3-0

Alaska
No playoffs

Arizona
6A — Hamilton (Chandler) def. Perry (Gilbert), 3-1
5A — Millennium (Goodyear) def. Cactus Shadows (Cave Creek), 3-0
4A — Salpointe Catholic (Tucson) def. Notre Dame Prep (Scottsdale), 3-2
3A — Northwest Christian (Phoenix) def. Valley Christian (Chandler), 3-0
2A — Scottsdale Christian Academy (Phoenix) def. Chandler Prep (Chandler), 3-0
1A — St. David def. Anthem Prep (Anthem), 3-1
CAA I —

Arkansas
6A — Fayetteville def. Southside (Fort Smith), 3-1
5A — Greenwood def. Jonesboro, 3-0
4A — Valley View (Jonesboro) def. Brookland, 3-0
3A — Hackett def. Paris, 3-0
2A — Mansfield def. Lavaca, 3-0

California
Winter season

Colorado
5A —
4A —
3A —
2A —
1A —

Connecticut
LL —
L —
M —
S —

Delaware
I — St. Mark's (Wilmington) def. Padua Academy (Wilmington), 3-0

District of Columbia
DCSAA —

Florida

7A — Lyman (Longwood) def. Lake Nona (Orlando), 3-2
6A — Mater Academy Charter (Hialeah Gardens) def. Leon (Tallahassee), 3-1
5A — Ponte Vedra def. Jensen Beach, 3-0
4A — Bishop Kenny (Jacksonville) def. Cardinal Gibbons (Fort Lauderdale), 3-1
3A — Trinity Catholic (Ocala) def. Westminster Christian (Miami), 3-0
2A — Lake Worth Christian (Boynton Beach) def. St. John Paul II (Tallahassee), 3-0
1A — Sneads def. Newberry, 3-0

Georgia
AAAAAAA — Alpharetta def. Walton (Marietta), 3-1
AAAAAA — Buford def. Pope (Marietta), 3-1
AAAAA — McIntosh (Peachtree City) def. Blessed Trinity (Roswell), 3-1
AAAA — Marist (Atlanta) def. Northwest Whitfield (Tunnel Hill), 3-0
AAA — Westminster (Atlanta) def. Morgan County (Madison), 3-0
AA-A Public — Pace Academy (Atlanta) def. Gordon Lee (Chickamauga), 3-2
AA-A Private — Holy Innocents Episcopal (Atlanta) def. Hebron Christian Academy (Dacula), 3-1
GISA AA — Oak Mountain Academy (Carrollton) def. Augusta Prep Day (Augusta), 3-1
GISA AAA — Valwood (Valdosta) def. Dominion Christian (Marietta), 3-1
GAPPS Div. I-AA — Peachtree Academy (Covington) def. Calvary Christian (Columbus)
GAPPS Div. II — Fideles Christian (Cumming) def. Konos Academy (Fayetteville)
GAPPS Div. I-A — Habersham Central (Mt. Airy) def. Oakwood Christian (Chickamauga)


Hawaii
Winter season

Idaho
5A — Skyview (Nampa) def. Boise, 3-2
4A — Lakeland (Rathdrum) def. Middleton, 3-0
3A — Sugar-Salem (Sugar City) def. Kimberly, 3-0
2A — West Side (Dayton) def. Bear Lake (Montpelier), 3-2
1A Division I — Grace def. Genesee, 3-0
1A Division II — Tri-Valley (Cambridge) def. Castleford, 3-1

Illinois
Winter season

Indiana
4A — Yorktown def. Munster, 3-1
3A — Fort Wayne Bishop Dwenger (Fort Wayne) def. Brebeuf Jesuit Preparatory (Indianapolis), 3-2
2A — Barr-Reeve (Montgomery) def. Wapahani (Selma), 3-0
1A — Pioneer (Royal Center) def. Loogootee, 3-1

Iowa
5A — Ankeny def. Iowa City, 3-1
4A — Xavier (Cedar Rapids) def. West Delaware (Manchester), 3-0
3A — Osage def. Mt. Vernon, 3-0
2A — Dike-New Hartford (Dike) def. Denver, 3-0
1A — Notre Dame (Burlington) def. Gladbrook-Reinbeck (Reinbeck), 3-1

Kansas
6A — Blue Valley West (Stilwell) def. Olathe Northwest (Olathe), 2-1
5A — Aquinas (Overland Park) def. Lansing, 2-1
4A — Bishop Miege (Shawnee Mission) def. Andale, 2-0
3A — Sabetha def. Smoky Valley (Lindsborg), 2-1
2A — Heritage Christian Academy (Olathe) def. Smith Center, 2-0
1A D1 — Central Plains (Claflin) def. Lebo, 2-0
1A D2 — Hanover def. Attica, 2-0

Kentucky

State — Notre Dame Academy (Park Hills) def. Mercy (Louisville), 3-2

Louisiana
I — St. Mary's Dominican (New Orleans) def. St. Joseph's Academy (Baton Rouge), 3-1
II — Teurlings Catholic (Lafayette) def. St. Thomas More (Lafayette), 3-1
III — Archbishop Hannan (Covington) def. Cabrini (New Orleans), 3-0
IV — Academy of the Sacred Heart (New Orleans) def. Pope John Paul II (Slidell), 3-1
V — Metairie Park Country Day (Metairie) def. McGehee (New Orleans), 3-0

Maine
Winter season

Maryland
4A —
3A —
2A —
1A —
IAAM A —
IAAM B —
IAAM C —

Massachusetts
1 —
2 —
3 —

Michigan
1 — Marian (Bloomfield Hills) def. Lowell, 3-0
2 — Christian (Grand Rapids) def. Lakewood (Lake Odessa), 3-0
3 — St. Mary Catholic Central (Monroe) def. Schoolcraft, 3-0
4 — St. Philip Catholic Central (Battle Creek) def. Oakland Christian (Auburn Hills), 3-2

Minnesota
No state tournament

Mississippi
6A — DeSoto Central (Southaven) def. Brandon, 3-1
5A — Lake Cormorant (Lake Cormorant) def. Long Beach, 3-2
4A — Vancleave def. Pontotoc, 3-0
3A — St. Andrew's Episcopal (Ridgeland) def. Belmont, 3-0
2A — Walnut def. Puckett, 3-2
1A — Resurrection Catholic (Pascagoula) def. Hickory Flat, 3-0
MAIS — Jackson Academy (Jackson) def. Hartfield Academy (Flowood), 3-1

Missouri
Class 5 — Liberty North (Liberty) def. Nixa, 3-0
Class 4 — Willard def. Parkway West (Ballwin, 3-1
Class 3 — Maryville def. Central (Park Hills), 3-0
Class 2 — Christian (Springfield) def. Valle Catholic (Ste. Genevieve), 3-2
Class 1 — Advance def. Lesterville, 3-1

Montana
AA — Capital (Helena) def. Russell (Great Falls), 3-2
A — Billings Central Catholic (Billings) def. Hardin, 3-0
B — Joliet def. Huntley Project (Worden), 3-0
C — Bridger def. Manhattan Christian (Manhattan), 3-1

Nebraska
A — Elkhorn South (Omaha) def. Papillion-LaVista South (Papillion), 3-0
B — Skutt Catholic (Omaha) def. Norris (Firth), 3-1
C1 — Wahoo def. St. Paul, 3-2
C2 — Lutheran-Northeast (Norfolk) def. Norfolk Catholic (Norfolk), 3-2
D1 — Pleasanton def. Archbishop Bergan (Fremont), 3-0
D2 — Diller-Odell (Odell) def. Chambers/Wheeler Central (Chambers), 3-2

Nevada
Winter season

New Hampshire
I — Bedford def. Hollis-Brookline (Hollis), 3-0
II — Gilford def. Stark (Weare), 3-0
III — Newfound Regional (Bristol) def. Trinity (Manchester), 3-0

New Jersey
Winter season

New Mexico
Winter season

New York
Winter season

North Carolina
4A —
3A —
2A —
1A —
NCCSA 2A — Union Grove Christian (Lexington) def. Wilson Christian Academy (Wilson), 3-2
NCCSA 1A — Fayetteville Street Christian (Asheboro) def. Oak Level Baptist Academy (Stokesdale), 3-1
NCISSA 1A — Lee Christian (Sanford) def. Kerr-Vance Academy (Henderson), 3-0
NCISSA 2A — Caldwell Academy (Greensboro) def. Gaston Day (Gastonia), 3-0
NCISSA 3A — Asheville Christian Academy (Swannanoa) def. Cary Christian (Cary), 3-2
NCISSA 4A — North Raleigh Christian Academy (Raleigh) def. Cannon (Concord), 3-0

North Dakota
A — Century (Bismarck) def. West Fargo, 3-1
B — Linton/Hazelton-Moffit-Braddock (Linton) def. Langdon/Edmore/Munich (Langdon), 3-0

Ohio
I — Mount Notre Dame (Cincinnati) def. Padua Franciscan (Parma), 3-1
II — Gilmour Academy (Gates Mills) def. Notre Dame-Cathedral Latin (Chardon), 3-2
III — Huron def. Independence, 3-2
IV — Calvert (Tiffin) def New Bremen, 3-1

Oklahoma
6A — Bishop Kelley (Tulsa) def. Mustang, 3-2
5A — Victory Christian (Tulsa) def. Mount St. Mary (Oklahoma City), 3-0
4A — Lincoln Christian (Tulsa) def. Christian Heritage (Del City), 3-1
3A — Community Christian (Norman) def. Heritage Hall (Oklahoma City), 3-2

Oregon
6A —
5A —
4A —
3A —
2A —
1A —

Pennsylvania
AAAA — North Allegheny (Wexford) def. Unionville (Kennett Square), 3-0
AAA — Bethlehem Catholic (Bethlehem) def. Franklin Regional (Murrysville), 3-0
AA — Trinity (Camp Hill) def. Philipsburg-Osceola (Philipsburg), 3-1
A — Clarion Area (Clarion) def. Marian Catholic (Tamaqua), 3-0

Rhode Island
Winter season

South Carolina
AAAAA — Wando (Mt. Pleasant) def. T.L. Hanna (Anderson), 3-2
AAAA — Hilton Head (Hilton Head Island) def. Pickens, 3-1
AAA — Powdersville (Greenville) def. Oceanside Collegiate Academy (Mt. Pleasant), 3-0
AA — Chesnee def. Andrew Jackson (Kershaw), 3-0
A — Southside Christian (Simpsonville) def. Bamberg-Ehrhardt (Bamberg, S.C.), 3-0
SCISA AAA — Cardinal Newman (Columbia) def. Porter-Gaud (Charleston), 3-2
SCISA AA — Spartanburg Christian Academy (Spartanburg) def. Northside Christian Academy (Lexington), 3-0
SCISA A — Newberry Academy (Newberry) def. Patrick Henry Academy (Estill), 3-1

South Dakota
AA — O'Gorman (Sioux Falls) def. Huron, 3-1
A — Sioux Falls Christian (Sioux Falls) def. Dakota Valley (North Sioux City), 3-0
B — Northwestern Area (Mellette) def. Warner, 3-1

Tennessee
3A — Brentwood def. Siegel (Murfreesboro), 3-0
2A — Nolensville def. Anderson County (Clinton), 3-1
1A — Summertown def. Loretto, 3-0
II-AA — Briarcrest Christian (Eads) def. Baylor (Chattanooga), 3-0
II-A — Goodpasture Christian def. Notre Dame (Chattanooga), 3-1

Texas
6A — Seven Lakes (Katy) def. Klein, 3-1
5A — Lovejoy (Lucas) def. Fulshear, 3-0
4A — Decatur def. Wimberley, 3-0
3A — Bushland def. Goliad, 3-0
2A — Iola def. Crawford, 3-1
1A — Neches def. Blum, 3-0
Southwest Prep —
TAPPS 1A — Christ Academy (Wichita Falls) def. Atonement Academy (San Antonio), 3-0
TAPPS 2A — Ovilla Christian (Red Oak) def. Bracken Christian (Bulverde), 3-0
TAPPS 3A — New Braunfels Christian Academy (New Braunfels) def. Midland Classical Academy (Midland), 3-0
TAPPS 4A — Northland Christian (Houston) def. Lake Country Christian (Fort Worth), 3-1
TAPPS 5A — St. Joseph (Victoria) def. Prince of Peace (Carrollton), 3-0
TAPPS 6A — Liberty Christian (Argyle) def. St. Agnes Academy (Houston), 3-2
TCAL 2A — Poetry Community Christian (Poetry) def. Lighthouse HomeSchool (Port Arthur), 3-0
TCAL 1A — Annapolis Christian Academy (Corpus Christi) def. Salem Sayers Baptist Academy (Adkins), 3-0
TCAF II — Victory Christian Academy (Decatur) def. Victory Baptist Academy (Weatherford)
TCAF I — Westlake Academy (Westlake) def. Christian Life Preparatory (Fort Worth), 3-0

Utah
6A — Lone Peak (Highland) def. Copper Hills (West Jordan), 3-1
5A — Timpview (Provo) def. Mountain View (Orem), 3-2
4A — Sky View (Smithfield) def. Snow Canyon (St. George), 3-1
3A — Union (Roosevelt) def. Morgan, 3-1
2A — North Summit (Coalville) def. Millard (Fillmore), 3-0
1A — Valley (Orderville) def. Rich (Randolph), 3-1

Vermont
Winter season

Virginia
6A —
5A —
4A —
3A —
2A —
1A —
VISAA 1 —
VISAA 2 —
VISAA 3 —

Washington
Winter season

West Virginia
AAA — Musselman (Inwood) def. George Washington (Charleston), 3-2
AA — Shady Spring def. Philip Barbour (Philippi), 3-0
A — Wirt County (Elizabeth) def. East Hardy (Baker), 3-0

Wisconsin
1 — Hamilton (Sussex) def. Burlington, 3-1
2 — Luxemburg-Casco (Luxemburg) def. Lakeside Lutheran (Lake Mills), 3-0
3 — Howards Grove def. Waterloo, 3-1
4 — Catholic Central (Burlington) def. McDonell Central (Chippewa Falls), 3-0

Wyoming
4A — Laramie def. Kelly Walsh (Casper), 3-1
3A — Mountain View def. Worland, 3-0
2A — Sundance def. Riverside (Basin), 3-0
1A — Cokeville def. Meeteetse, 3-1

MLB Draft: Top 5 high school middle infield prospects - HIGHSCORE
MLB Draft: Top 5 high school middle infield prospects
Video: 10 Extreme high schools via Google Earth
See these campuses that run north to south and east to west.

While high school outfielders will be the most coveted preps in next week's Major League Baseball Draft, the same can not be said for middle infielders.

High school shortstops have often been the prize at the top of the MLB draft with seven prep shortstops going No. 1 overall since Chipper Jones was the top pick in 1990. Only 14 preps have gone No. 1 overall since 1990, meaning half of them were shortstops.

This year, however, very few shortstops make the cut with one likely to be chosen in the first round. Additionally, some of the top prospects have given strong commitments to college, meaning they will likely be bypassed in a draft that is only five rounds long in favor of a player who is ready to sign and play.

Since there will be far fewer draft selections this year, MaxPreps is providing a truncated look at the top high school selections for the MLB Draft, scheduled for June 10-11. Instead of the usual Top 10, MaxPreps looks at the Top 5 players at six different positions. We've previously presented corner infielders and outfielders.
Graphic by Ryan Escobar
Ed Howard, Chicago Mt. Carmel (Chicago)
Easily the top high school shortstop prospect, Howard likely will stick at the position due to his strong and fluid fielding skills. Howard has also sported a solid bat after batting over .400 in one of the toughest leagues in the nation with 29 RBI and three home runs. Look for Howard to go somewhere in the middle of the first round. Projection: Top 15 pick.

Yohandy Morales, Braddock (Miami)
At 6-foot-4, Morales shows a lot of potential to be the type of big shortstop in the mold of an Alex Rodriguez or a Cal Ripkin Jr. His hitting skills have vastly improved, batting .321 with two home runs as a junior, but had boosted his totals to batting .500 with four home runs in nine games as a senior. Projection: Second round.

Drew Bowser, Harvard-Westlake (Studio City, Calif.)
Bowser showed his power this spring when he hit grand slams in back-to-back games. Scouts project Bowser to be a power-hitting infielder in the major leagues, which could mean a move to third base at some point. Bowser has committed to Stanford and reportedly will play in college. With a five-round draft, teams may not waste a pick on a player committed to play in college. Nevertheless, Bowser is at least a second-round talent. Projection: Second or third round.

Cade Horton, Norman (Okla.)
Horton likely will have a decision if he gets drafted. He's already committed to play both football and baseball at the University of Oklahoma, but selection in the MLB draft could be a game-changer. Horton threw for 3,084 yards and ran for 1,149 for Norman. In baseball, he was the Gatorade State Player of the Year with a career .420 batting average. Like Bowser, Horton likely won't be drafted if he is serious about playing football in college. Projection: Third round.

Milan Tolentino, Santa Margarita (Rancho Santa Margarita, Calif.)
The son of Jose Tolentino, a former MLB player and current MLB broadcaster, Milan Tolentino has been one of the top shortstops in Southern California for the past several years. He led his team to a Southern Section championship as a junior when he batted .391 and was named Southern Section Division 2 Player of the Year. He has signed to play at UCLA. Projection: Fourth round.
High school basketball: NFHS opens door for states to adopt 35-second shot clock - HIGHSCORE
High school basketball: NFHS opens door for states to adopt 35-second shot clock
Beginning with the 2022-23 season, states can decide to adopt and use a 35-second shot clock for high school basketball games. The National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS) approved the measure that leaves open the door for major change across the hardwood landscape in coming years.

Nine states use either a 30- or 35-second shot clock, but the adoption of Rule 2-14 says that each state association may adopt a shot clock beginning in the 2022-23 season — according to guidelines outlined in the Basketball Rules Book — to encourage standardization among states.

“We provided the committee with a lot of information regarding the shot clock, including responses to a 46-question survey sent to states currently using a shot clock,” said Theresia Wynns, NFHS director of sports and officials and liaison to the Basketball Rules Committee.

Prior to the 2020-21 season, the Georgia High School Association approved a phase-in of a 30-second shot clock for all varsity boys and girls basketball games, becoming the ninth state to adopt a shot clock.

The Peach State joined California, Maryland, Massachusetts, New York, North Dakota, Rhode Island, South Dakota and Washington as the only states to use a 30- or 35-second shot clock.

Guidelines approved by the NFHS include displaying two timepieces connected to a horn that is distinctive from the game-clock horn, and using an alternative timing device, such as a stopwatch at the scorer’s table, for a shot clock malfunction. The guidelines also allow for corrections to the shot clock only during the shot-clock period in which an error occurred and the officials have definite information relative to the mistake or malfunction.

Although a proposal for a national rule mandating a shot clock was not approved, the ruling is likely to bring momentum to the shot-clock movement across high school basketball.

According to the most recent NFHS High School Athletics Participation Survey, a total of 540,769 boys participated in basketball in 18,617 schools, and 399,067 girls participated in the sport in 18,210 schools across the country. It is the third-most popular sport for boys and girls.

The NFHS paved the way for states to adopt a 35-second shot clock, like the one used in the 2019 Washington 3A semifinals.
File photo by Paul Caldwell
The NFHS paved the way for states to adopt a 35-second shot clock, like the one used in the 2019 Washington 3A semifinals.

Ohio releases 'Return to Play Recommendations' for Aug. 1 high school sports start - HIGHSCORE
Ohio releases 'Return to Play Recommendations' for Aug. 1 high school sports start
Hours after Gov. Mike DeWine on Wednesday mandated masks in all 88 counties, the Ohio High School Athletic Association sent a 22-page "Return to Play Recommendations" memo to member schools with additional sport-specific suggestions to combat the COVID-19 pandemic for the fall calendar. Practices for the Ohio fall sports season start Aug. 1.

"The OHSAA fully intends to support its member schools and the student-athletes who desire to compete in interscholastic athletics and will continue to assess all areas as more information becomes available," OHSAA interim executive director Bob Goldring said.

The guidelines — created via input from a myriad of state agencies and the National Federation of State High School Associations — won't supplant orders, mandates or requirements imposed by DeWine or the Ohio Department of Health.

The memo, which comes a day after the Ohio High School Football Coaches Association released a 38-page safety protocol proposal to its membership, includes plans for pre-participation screening, positive tests and travel considerations. It also features details on game-day operations including officials, event staff, spectators, bands, cheerleaders and concessions.

General guidelines for all sports include maintaining social distancing when not on the field or court, using face coverings while not competing, and dialing back or cutting unnecessary travel. It also recommends reducing or eliminating sharing of common equipment, and limiting contact frequency with student-athletes from schools and non-interscholastic programs outside of each school's league, conference or normal competition sphere.

Specific recommendations for football include extending the team box on both sides of the field to the 10-yard lines and having offensive players take the ball back to the huddle between snaps while officials would mark the line of scrimmage with a bean bag.

Staggered start times in cross country and nullifying switching benches between sets in volleyball were suggested.

Postgame handshakes in all sports will be eliminated.

"The OHSAA understands that the physical and mental benefits of participation in education-based interscholastic athletics are numerous and are heightened even more during this pandemic," Goldring said. "There is no doubt that the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic has already resulted in thousands of our students missing out on these life-shaping educational experiences over the past several months, and we certainly hope we can return to some type of normalcy as it relates to interscholastic athletics soon."

Three of the OHSAA's fall sports have been acknowledged as low contact, including boys and girls golf, girls tennis and volleyball. Those sports can have competitions between schools.

Competitions between schools in football, boys and girls soccer, boys and girls cross country, and field hockey have not yet been approved.

"We just don't know yet," DeWine said. "Our ability to play sports and go back to school depends on what we do in the next few weeks."
Ohio introduced "Return to Play Recommendations" on Thursday for fall sports.
File photo by Jeff Harwell
Ohio introduced "Return to Play Recommendations" on Thursday for fall sports.