Watch :: - OFFICIAL


High school basketball: Teams with most championships - OFFICIAL
High school basketball: Teams with most championships
DeMatha (Hyattsville, Md.) leads our list of high school basketball programs with the most championships, although the Stags don't exactly play for a title at the state level. DeMatha is one of 13 West Catholic Athletic Conference members, traditionally one of the toughest leagues in the country. Despite playing against some of the top teams on the East Coast, DeMatha has managed to claim 41 WCAC championships and that type of success can't be overlooked.

The Stags have dominated WCAC play, winning 41 of the 60 conference championships including a string of 22 of 25 titles between 1961 and 1985 under legendary coach Morgan Wootten.

DeMatha leads Booker T. Washington (Tulsa, Okla.), which had 33 state championships over the course of two different eras. Playing in the segregation era, Booker T. Washington won 17 state championships in the Oklahoma Interscholastic Athletic Association. After integration, the Hornets won another 16 state titles in the Oklahoma Secondary Schools Athletic Association.

Tied for third are William Penn Charter (Philadelphia) and Madison-Ridgeland (Madison, Miss.). Like DeMatha, Penn Charter and MRA do not play for championships in the state association postseason tournaments. Penn Charter is a member of the Inter-Academic Conference in the Philadelphia area of Pennsylvania. Started in 1887, the Inter-AC is one of the oldest continuing conferences in the nation, but it does not play in the Pennsylvania Interscholastic Association.

Likewise, Madison-Ridgeland is not a member of the Mississippi High Schools Activities Association, but instead plays in the MidSouth Association of Independent Schools (MAIS), which was formed in 1968. The Patriots have won 32 class championships in the MAIS and 13 overall titles. The overall championship is determined by a tournament involving all of the class tournament finalists. Longtime coach Richard Duease, the winningest coach in Mississippi history, has led the Patriots to all their state titles.

The No. 5 team on the list is St. Anthony (Jersey City, N.J.), which won 27 state championships, 26 of them under longtime coach Bob Hurley.

The following list includes a Top 25 along with a listing of all other teams known to have won at least 10 championships. Aside from state associations, independent school associations are also included. Champions lists for all independent schools association were not available. Any additions or corrects, contact Kevin Askeland at [email protected] Sources for the list include the NFHS record book, state association record books.
DeMatha has won the most boys basketball titles, grabbing 41 WCAC crowns. The 2015-16 team was one squad that helped that total.
File photo by Patrick Kane
DeMatha has won the most boys basketball titles, grabbing 41 WCAC crowns. The 2015-16 team was one squad that helped that total.
Programs with 10-plus championships

1.   41 — DeMatha (Hyattsville, Md.)
2.   33 — Booker T. Washington (Tulsa, Okla.)
2.   33 — Wheeling Central Catholic (Wheeling, W. Va.)*
4.   32 — William Penn Charter (Philadelphia)
4.   32 — Madison-Ridgeland Academy (Madison, Miss.)
6.   30 — Benedictine (Richmond, Va.)*
7.   27 — St. Anthony (Jersey City, N.J.)
8.   26 — Central (Cheyenne, Wyo.)
9.   24 — Hillhouse (New Haven, Conn.)
9.   24 — Germantown Academy (Fort Washington, Pa.)
11.   22 — Bishop Gorman (Las Vegas)
12. 21 — Bishop Hendricken (Warwick, R.I.)
12. 21 — Portsmouth (N.H.)
12. 21 — Burlington (Vt.)
15. 20 — Wyandotte (Kansas City, Kan.)
16. 19 — Manchester Central (Manchester, N.H.)
16. 19 — Jackson Prep (Jackson, Miss.)
18. 18 — Clinton (N.Y.)
18. 18 — Scott County Central (Sikeston, Mo.)
18. 18 — Miami (Fla.)
18. 18 — Proctor (Vt.)
18. 18 — Minot (N.D.)
23. 17 — Haverford School (Haverford, Pa.)
23. 17 — Lanier (Jackson, Miss.)
23. 17 — Provo (Utah)
23. 17 — Hobbs (N.M.)
23. 17 — Virginia City (Nev.)
23. 17 — Central (Little Rock, Ark.)
23. 17 — Wheatley (Houston)

16 championships
Campbell County (Gillette, Wyo.)
Dunbar (Baltimore)
East Anchorage (Anchorage, Alaska)
Hope Christian (Albuquerque)
Lanier (Sugar Hill, Ga.)
Malvern Prep (Malvern, Pa.)
Mitchell (S.D.)
Phoenix Union (Ariz.)
Rice Memorial (South Burlington, Vt.)
Westbury Christian (Houston)
Woodrow Wilson (Beckley, W. Va.)

15 championships
Episcopal Academy (Newtown Square, Pa.)
Garfield (Seattle)
Lincoln High (Neb.)
Martinsville (Va.)
Millwood (Oklahoma City)
Southern Lab (Baton Rouge, La.)
Zwolle (La.)

14 championships
Allegany (Cumberland, Md.)
Boys & Girls (Brooklyn, N.Y.)
Douglass (Oklahoma City)
Malone (Fla.)
Mesa (Ariz.)
Natrona County (Casper, Wyo.)
New Hanover (Wilmington, N.C.)
Pahranagat Valley (Alamo, Nev.)
Patrick School (Hillside, N.J.)
River Rouge (Mich.)
Seton Hall Prep (West Orange, N.J.)
Virgin Valley (Mesquite, Nev.)
Westerly (R.I.)
Wilbur Cross (New Haven, Conn.)

13 championships
Bangor (Maine)
Bismarck (N.D.)
Borah (Boise, Idaho)
Creighton Prep (Omaha, Neb.)
Durham (N.C.)
Huntington (W. Va.)
Lincoln (Brooklyn, N.Y.)
McPherson (Kan.)
Newton (Kan.)
Parkview (Little Rock, Ark.)
Pine Bluff (Ark.)
Reno (Nev.)
Rock Springs (Wyo.)
Central (Tulsa, Okla.)
West Rutland (Vt.)

12 championships
Albuquerque (N.M.)
Boulder City (Nev.)
Central (Providence, R.I.)
Cliff (N.M.)
Conant (Jaffrey, N.H.)
DeLaSalle (Minneapolis)
Groveton (N.H.)
Las Vegas (Nev.)
Lehi (Utah)
Lincoln Northeast (Lincoln, Neb.)
Manual (Denver, Colo.)
Spaulding (Barre, Vt.)
Star Valley (Afton, Wyo.)
Vashon (St. Louis, Mo.)
Harding (Bridgeport, Conn.)
Winooski (Vt.)
Wyoming Indian (Ethete, Wyo.)

11 championships
Abraham Clark (Roselle, N.J.)
Burlington (Wyo.)
Camden (N.J.)
Charleston (Mo.)
Christ the King (Middle Village, N.Y.)
Denver East (Denver)
Sacred Heart (Falls City, Neb.)
Fort Thomas (Ariz.)
Greensboro Day School (Greensboro, N.C.)
Huron (S.D.)
Idaho Falls (Idaho)
Jonesboro (Ark.)
Juneau-Douglas (Juneau, Alaska)
Kinston (N.C.)
Mater Dei (Santa Ana, Calif.)
Moscow (Idaho)
Nashua South (Nashua, N.H.)
Punahou (Honolulu)
Savannah (Ga.)
South Portland (Maine)
South Sevier (Monroe, Utah)
St. Joseph (Trumbull, Conn.)
St. Michael's (Santa Fe, N.M.)
Sunnyside Christian (Sunnyside, Wash.)
Wahoo (Neb.)

10 championships
Beaverhead County (Dillon, Mont.)
Bingham (South Jordan, Utah)
Buffalo (Wyo.)
Butte (Mont.)
Great Falls (Mont.)
Great Falls (S.C.)
Gwynn Park (Brandywine, Md.)
Hall (Little Rock, Ark.)
Helena (Mont.)
Hopkins (Minnetonka, Minn.)
'Iolani (Honolulu)
Jonesport-Beals (Jonesport, Maine)
Lapwai (Idaho)
Lowry (Winnemucca, Nev.)
Lynden (Wash.)
Newport News (Va.)
Northfork (W. Va.)
Omaha Central (Omaha, Neb.)
Pocatello (Idaho)
Portland (Maine)
Poultney (Vt.)
Preston (Idaho)
Randolph (Wis.)
Hatch (Uniontown, Ala.)
Redemptorist (Baton Rouge, La.)
Rigby (Idaho)
Sanford (Hockessin, Del.)
St. Jude Educational Institute (Montgomery, Ala.)
Pima (Ariz.)
Thatcher (Ariz.)
Washington (Sioux Falls, S.D.)
South (Wichita, Kan.)
Yankton (S.D.)
High school baseball: Every player with 20 or more home runs in a single season - OFFICIAL
High school baseball: Every player with 20 or more home runs in a single season
Jordon Adell of Ballard (Louisville, Ky.) hit 25 home runs in 2017 and earned the MaxPreps National Player of the Year honor. And while his total ranks 16th all-time in the history of high school baseball, it may have been the greatest home-run hitting season ever.

Akin to Babe Ruth's 54-home run season of 1920, Adell's home run total is a complete outlier from the seasons that occurred prior to and after his big season. In the four years prior to 2017, no high school player hit more than 20 home runs (two hit exactly 20). While two of the high school seasons since Adell graduated have been affected by COVID, no player in the nation has hit 20 or more home runs since.

Yet Adell is not close to being the national single season home run record holder. Perhaps the reason is that he was born at the wrong time and perhaps the wrong place.

MaxPreps has compiled a list of every high school hitter who has bashed at least 20 home runs in a season, starting with Tracy Holt of Asher (Okla.), who is believed to be the first 20-home run hitter in 1979. One trend that becomes immediately apparent is that 20-home run seasons have been a bit of a roller coaster over the past 40 years with highs around the year 2000 and the year 2010. And there's a good reason for that.

In 2001, the National Federation of High Schools passed a rule that ordered all bats used in high school play to mirror the new NCAA ball exit speed rule (BESR).
Graphic by Ryan Escobar
"We need to stay vigilant to ways in which technology is having an impact," said NFHS President Dick Durost in January 2000. "The new rule will make the physical dimensions of non-wood bats more closely mirror those of wood bats."

The new bat rule had an immediate affect on the total number of 20-home run hitters. After a total of 12 players hit 20 or more home runs in 1998, 13 in 1999 and 11 in 2000 (including national records of 30 by Wade Miller of Alabama in 2000 and Josh Gray in 1999), the totals plummeted to five in 2002, three in 2003 and two in 2004.

But then the home run totals started to rise again. This was due to the creation of composite bats. According to cheapbats.com in 2013, composite bats worked the opposite of aluminum bats. While aluminum bats provided plenty of offensive pop while new, they deadened after extensive use. Composite bats were the opposite and actually became "hotter" after more use.

Thus by 2010, an all-time high of 15 players had hit 20 or more homers and in 2011 there were 13. The NFHS then instituted another rule for the 2012 season, specifying that all bats needed to match the Ball Batted Coefficient of Restitution (BBCOR) performance standard rather than the BESR standard.

Again 20-home run hitters nosedived to the point that only four accomplished the feat in 2012 and only four have done it in the nine years since, topped by Adell's 25 in 2017, which now becomes much more impressive in hindsight. Home run totals at the NCAA level also mirrors this high school phenomenon with peaks in 2000 and 2010.

For some unexplained reason, playing in Oklahoma is also conducive to hitting lots of home runs. Of the 152 players who have hit 20 or more home runs in a single season, 46 (30 percent) are from the Sooner State. Alabama is second on the list with 15. Baseball powerhouse states Florida, California and Texas have 14 combined.

One reason that Oklahoma has so many on the list is that teams play a high number of games (as many as 50) in a season. However, so does Alabama, which has a third of the number of players on the list as Oklahoma.

Another reason might be that many of those players come from the smallest schools in the state and those players compete in the fall and the spring. Playing as many as 70-80 games in a school year allows those players to hone their skills through practice and repetition.

Additionally, those small schools regularly play much larger schools during the spring season. Case in point, Roff, one of the top small school teams in the state, has an enrollment of 90 and the town has a population of 700. Yet, Roff defeated Deer Creek (Edmond), enrollment 1,600. This year Red Oak, enrollment 81, defeated Union (Tulsa), enrollment 3,500, and Broken Arrow, 3,800. Tougher competition may sharpen the hitting skills of those small school players and better prepare them for the competition at their own level.

Whatever the reason, Oklahoma has a strong presence on MaxPreps single season home runs list. In fact, an Oklahoma player has held the national record 31 of the past 42 seasons.

Holt set the record in 1979, but Dave Clark of Shannon (Miss.) broke the record the following year with 23. Anthony Whitson of Unicoi County (Tenn.) upped the record to 24 in 1987 and Ricky Vanderburg of Bokchito (Okla.) raised it to 26 in 1989. Shon Walker of Harrison County (Ky.) put the record at 29 in 1992 and Chris Aguilla of McQueen (Reno, Nev.) tied the mark in 1997. Gray hit the current national record of 30 in the fall of 1999 and Miller tied the mark in the spring of 2000.

Gray, by the way, holds the record for most home runs in a calendar school year, hitting 26 in the spring of 1999 and 30 in the fall of 1999 for a total of 56 in the two seasons combined.

Notable professional players on the list include Bo Jackson of McAdory (Ala.) with 20 in 1980, Joey Gallo of Bishop Gorman (Las Vegas) with 25 in 2011, Mike Moustakas of Chatsworth (Calif.) with 24 in 2007 and Preston Wilson of Bamberg-Ehrhardt (S.C.) with 22 in 1992.

Sources for the list include the NFHS record book, state association record books, coaches association record books, Georgia Dugout Preview, Cal-Hi Sports Record Book by Mark and Nelson Tennis, MaxPreps leaderboards, and various newspapers accessed through newspapers.com.

Corrections or additions? E-mail Kevin Askeland at [email protected]
Jordon Adell, Ballard
File photo by Alyson Boyer Rode
Jordon Adell, Ballard
Single-season home run leaders

30 — Wade Miller, Long (Skipperville, Ala.), 2000
30 — Josh Gray, Rock Creek (Bokchito, Okla.), 1999
29 — Shon Walker, Harrison County (Cynthiana, Ky.), 1992
29 — Chris Aguilla, McQueen (Reno, Nev.), 1997
28 — James Peterson, Winterset (Iowa), 2000
28 — Jacob Realmuto, Carl Albert (Midwest City, Okla.), 2010
28 — Taylor Hawkins, Carl Albert (Midwest City, Okla.), 2012
27 — Brad Nelson, Bishop Garrigan (Algona, Iowa), 1999
27 — Trey Wingo, Rock Creek (Bokchito, Okla.), 2005
27 — Ethan Bennett, Farragut (Knoxville, Tenn.), 2010

27 — Kevin Cron, Mountain Pointe (Phoenix), 2011
26 — Ricky Vanderburg, Bokchito (Okla.), 1989
26 — Brendan McCurry, Roff (Roff, Okla.), 2010
26 — Christian Stewart, Providence Christian Academy (Lilburn, Ga.), 2012
26 — Hommy Rosado, Barbe (Lake Charles, La.), 2010
25 — Clayton Sander, Camanche (Iowa), 1988
25 — Will Hunt, Asher (Okla.), 1989
25 — Joe Little, Butner (Cromwell, Okla.), 1996
25 — Jason Stokes, Coppell (Texas), 2000
25 — Josh Peaslee, Carney (Okla.), 2000

25 — Micah Owings, Gainesville (Ga.), 2002
25 — Rich Witten, Danville (Ky.), 2006
25 — Brodie Pullen, Calhoun (Ga.), 2007
25 — Jose Trevino, John Paul II (Corpus Christi, Texas), 2011
25 — Joey Gallo, Bishop Gorman (Las Vegas), 2011
25 — Jordon Adell, Ballard (Louisville, Ky.), 2017
24 — Anthony Whitson, Unicoi County (Erwin, Tenn.) 1987
24 — Kyle Wingfield, Rock Creek (Bokchito, Okla.), 1998
24 — Josh Gray, Rock Creek (Bokchito, Okla.), 2000
24 — Dearth Parker, Roff (Okla.), 2005

24 — Colby Rasmus, Russell County (Seale, Ala.), 2005
24 — Mike Moustakas, Chatsworth (Calif.), 2007
24 — BJ Hermsen, West Delaware (Manchester, Iowa), 2008
24 — Zach Fish, Gull Lake (Richland, Mich.), 2011
24 — Clint Frazier, Loganville (Ga.), 2012
23 — Dave Clark, Shannon (Miss.), 1980
23 — Paul Morse, Danville (Ky.), 1992
23 — Joe Crede, Fatima (Westphalia, Mo.), 1996
23 — Drew Henson, Brighton (Mich.), 1997
23 — Jim Willison, Morley Stanwood (Morley, Mich.), 1998

23 — Kyle Wingfield, Rock Creek (Bokchito, Okla.), 1998
23 — Scott Riley, Pittsfield (Ill.), 1999
23 — K.W. Sexton, East Carter (Grayson, Ky.), 1999
23 — Cody Ehlers, Stillwater (Okla.), 2000
23 — Brian Barnett, McQueen (Reno, Nev.), 2007
23 — Kevin O'Leary, Wesleyan (Norcross, Ga.), 2010
22 — Marvin Moore, Roff (Okla.), 1984
22 — Patrick Ollis, Unicoi County (Erwin, Tenn.), 1986
22 — Mike McQuain, Depew (Okla.), 1986
22 — Mike Miller, Centerville (Iowa), 1988

22 — Preston Wilson, Bamberg-Ehrhardt (Bamberg, S.C.), 1992
22 — Jesse Eyre, Climax-Scotts (Climax, Mich.), 1998
22 — Drew Henson, Brighton (Mich.), 1998
22 — Corey Patterson, Harrison (Kennesaw, Ga.), 1998
22 — Jeremy Reed, Lookout Valley (Chattanooga, Tenn.), 1998
22 — Matt Ames, Stanhope Elmore (Millbrook, Ala.), 1999
22 — Alex Cadena, Alexander (Laredo, Texas), 1999
22 — Kyle Moyer, Mohawk (Sycamore, Ohio), 1999
22 — Matt Cooper, Ripley (Okla.), 2000
22 — Kevin Bookout, Stroud (Okla.), 2001

22 — Brandon Lowe, Vidalia (Ga.), 2003
22 — Jarrett Warren, Henry County (McDonough, Ga.), 2003
22 — Mitchell Trimmer, Roff (Okla.), 2004
22 — Del Howell, Tuscaloosa County (Northport, Ala.), 2006
22 — Adam Coe, Russell County (Seale, Ala.), 2006
22 — Jordan Swagerty, Prestonwood Christian (Plano, Texas), 2007
22 — Henry Castaigne, Lakehill Prep (Dallas), 2007
22 — Kris Bryant, Bonanza (Las Vegas), 2010
22 — Aaron Cornell, Roff (Okla.), 2010
22 — Kevin Cron, Mountain Pointe (Phoenix), 2010

22 — Ben Moore, Cullman (Cullman, Ala.), 2011
22 — Matthew Goodson, Oxford (Ala.), 2011
22 — Javier Baez, Arlington Country Day (Jacksonville, Fla.), 2011
22 — Ben Moore, Cullman (Ala.), 2011
22 — Kyle Carter, Columbus (Ga.), 2011
21 — David King, Asher (Okla.), 1983
21 — Brad Wilson, Towns County (Hiawassee, Ga.), 1988
21 — David Laffoon, Odin (Ill.), 1990
21 — Josh Gregson, Dale (Okla.), 1992
21 — Dion Newby, Harrison County (Cynthiana, Ky.), 1992

21 — Brad Allison, Harrison County (Cynthiana, Ky.), 1992
21 — Mike Wilson, Central (Marlow, Okla.), 1994
21 — Mike Wilson, Central (Marlow, Okla.), 1996
21 — Robby Williams, Doss (Louisville, Ky.), 1997
21 — Tommy Pearce, Marion (Ind.), 1998
21 — Corey Hart, Greenwood (Bowling Green, Ky.), 1999
21 — Billy Austin, Salina (Okla.), 1999
21 — Jeff Clement, Marshalltown (Iowa), 1999
21 — Justin Bowen, Rock Creek (Bokchito, Okla.), 2000
21 — Jeff Clement, Marshalltown (Iowa), 2000

21 — Joe Hooft, Galena (Reno, Nev.), 2001
21 — Justin Colbert, Allen (Okla.), 2001
21 — Bobby Glover, Caney (Okla.), 2001
21 — Chris Walston, El Capitan (Lakeside, Calif.), 2002
21 — Steven Lerud, Galena (Reno, Nev.), 2003
21 — Will Gaff, Streator (Ill.), 2005
21 — Brendan McCurry, Tupelo (Okla.), 2008
21 — Matt Hobgood, Norco (Calif.), 2009
21 — Randal Grichuk, Lamar Consolidated (Rosenberg, Texas), 2009
21 — Lance Jarreld, Goodpasture Christian (Madison, Tenn.), 2010

21 — Casey Kicklighter, Wayne County (Jesup, Ga.), 2010
21 — Aaron Chalk, Caney (Okla.), 2010
21 — Ajay Snow, Leroy (Ala.), 2011
21 — Joey Curletta, Mountain Pointe (Phoenix), 2011
21 — Joey Gallo, Bishop Gorman (Las Vegas), 2012
20 — Tracy Holt, Asher (Okla.), 1979
20 — Bo Jackson, McAdory (McCalla, Ala.), 1982
20 — Will Edwards, Unicoi County (Erwin, Tenn.), 1985
20 — Butch Harris, Broken Bow (Okla.), 1986
20 — Clifton McKenzie, Depew (Okla.), 1986

20 — Paul Brannon, Kings Mountain (N.C.), 1989
20 — Rod Walker, Morristown-Hamblen West (Morristown, Tenn.), 1989
20 — Heath Graham, Stringer (Miss.), 1993
20 — Russ Gload, East Hampton (N.Y.), 1994
20 — Ben Fjelland, North Polk (Alleman, Iowa), 1996
20 — Andy Baxter, Unicoi County (Erwin, Tenn.), 1997
20 — Jonathan Johnson, Unicoi County (Erwin, Tenn.), 1998
20 — Chris Martinez, Chaminade (West Hills, Calif.), 1998
20 — Kevin Bills, Reno (Nev.), 1998
20 — Brant Huff, Oktaha (Okla.), 1998
20 — Travis Loudermilk, Coalgate (Okla.), 1998

20 — Allen Clay, Rattan (Okla.), 1998
20 — Albert Concepcion, El Segundo (Calif.), 1999
20 — Russ Reyes, Assumption (Davenport, Iowa), 1999
20 — Justin Bowen, Rock Creek (Bokchito, Okla.), 1999
20 — Kyle Wingfield, Rock Creek (Bokchito, Okla.), 1999
20 — Jim Duffy, Airport (Carleton, Mich.), 2000
20 — Kyle Wingfield, Rock Creek (Bokchito, Okla.), 2000
20 — Jake Goodwin, Parkers Chapel (El Dorado, Ark.), 2001
20 — Timmy Sullivan, Leedey (Okla.), 2002
20 — Chance Douglass, Randall (Amarillo, Texas), 2002

20 — Reece Creswell, Perryton (Texas), 2004
20 — Ryan Pease, Hydro-Eakly (Hydro, Okla.), 2005
20 — Jake Smith, Hueytown (Hueytown, Ala.), 2005
20 — Jake Smith, Hueytown (Ala.), 2006
20 — Kyle Burke, Ooltewah (Tenn.), 2006
20 — David Kindred, American Christian Academy (Tuscaloosa, Ala.), 2006
20 — Derek Trent, Dobyns-Bennett (Kingsport, Tenn.), 2007
20 — Nathan Ramier, Western Dubuque (Epworth, Iowa), 2007
20 — Luke Bole, Hartselle (Ala.), 2009
20 — Brendan McCurry, Roff (Okla.), 2009

20 — Trevor Begley, Tushka (Atoka, Okla.), 2009
20 — Blake Logan, Roff (Okla.), 2009
20 — Dayne Parker, Roff (Okla.), 2010
20 — Kyle Gibson, Henderson County (Henderson, Ky.), 2010
20 — Matt Beaty, Dresden (Tenn.), 2010
20 — Hunter Renfroe, Copiah Academy (Gallman, Miss.), 2010
20 — Brad Warren, Donelson Christian Academy (Nashville, Tenn.), 2010
20 — Nick Masonia, Brooks (Killen, Ala.), 2011
20 — Evan Anderson, Dale (Okla.), 2011
20 — Gavin Lavalley, Carl Albert (Midwest City, Okla.), 2013

20 — Jacob Harrison, Grace Christian (Alexandria, La.), 2014
20 — Cody Muncy, Red Oak (Okla.), 2017

Chris Livingston named 2020-21 OFFICIAL Ohio High School Basketball Player of the Year - OFFICIAL
Chris Livingston named 2020-21 MaxPreps Ohio High School Basketball Player of the Year
Each year since 2006, MaxPreps has recognized outstanding performers in high school basketball. America's source for high school sports continues the tradition to close out the 2020-21 season by naming the top player in each state. Selections are based on team success and individual excellence, in addition to local and state accolades.

Chris Livingston of Buchtel (Akron) is the 2020-21 MaxPreps Ohio High School Basketball Player of the Year. The 6-foot-6, 190-pound junior helped the Griffins go 18-5 en route to the program's third district championship in the past three seasons.

Livingston averaged 31.1 points, 15.8 rebounds, 6.1 assists, 4.7 steals and 4.0 steals per game while shooting 71 percent from the field.

In January, Livingston produced a head-turning stat line in a win over East (Akron), going for 54 points, 12 rebounds, eight assists and eight steals. 

Livingston is regarded as the No. 4 prospect in the Class of 2022 according to 247Sports. He holds offers from Akron, Florida, LSU, Ohio State, Tennessee State and UAB.

Each state's MaxPreps Player of the Year will be considered for inclusion in the MaxPreps All-America Team, which is scheduled to be released April 13.
North Carolina high school football: Schedule, scores for NCHSAA state championship games - OFFICIAL
North Carolina high school football: Schedule, scores for NCHSAA state championship games
The North Carolina High School Athletic Association will host eight football state championship games featuring 10 undefeated teams beginning Thursday at the University of North Carolina and North Carolina State University.

Four title games — 1A, 2AA, 3A, 4AA — will be hosted at North Carolina State's Finley Stadium starting Thursday with the 2AA contest between Salisbury (8-2) and St. Pauls (8-0). It concludes Saturday with the 4AA tilt between Rolesville (9-0) and the state's No. 1 ranked team, Zebulon B. Vance (9-1).

The other four championship games — 1AA, 2A, 3AA, 4A — will be played at North Carolina's Kenan Stadium, starting Thursday with the 3AA contest between a pair of 10-0 squads, Mount Tabor and Cleveland. Two Saturday games finish off the championships, concluding with the 2A game between Mountain Heritage (7-1) and Reidsville (9-0).

In all, the 16 teams have combined for records of 140 wins and just eight defeats. All eight games with be broadcast on the NFHS Network.

The NCHSAA was one of 15 states to bypass traditional fall football due to the pandemic. Of the 11 states that played football in the spring, only three opted for playoffs and to crown state champions. Virginia did so last week and North Carolina and Rhode Island wrap up football championships for the 2020-21 season this week.

Among the many standouts in the championship games is Havelock senior running back Kamarro Edmonds, a 5-foot-11, 227 pound senior who has rushed for 916 yards and 15 touchdowns in eight games. He's ranked the No. 16 senior in the state by 247Sports and headed to North Carolina.

Also a basketball star who averaged over 30 points per game this year, Reidsville senior wide receiver Breon Pass is ranked the state No. 28 senior recruit overall after catching 83 passes for more than 1,400 yards and 27 touchdowns in his career heading into this season.
Havelock senior running back Kamarro Edmonds has signed to the University of North Carolina.
File photo by Carin-Goodall Gosnell
Havelock senior running back Kamarro Edmonds has signed to the University of North Carolina.
NCHSAA Football Championships

1A
Full bracket can be found here - 2020-2021 Football Championships 1A
High school football: Over 50 FBS-bound players fill Mater Dei, St. John Bosco rosters - OFFICIAL
High school football: Over 50 FBS-bound players fill Mater Dei, St. John Bosco rosters
Mater Dei (Santa Ana, Calif.) and St. John Bosco (Bellflower, Calif.) are two of the premier programs in high school football and have produced a boatload talent, especially as of late. Amon-Ra St. Brown, Bru McCoy, Bryce Young, Elias Ricks, JT Daniels and Mase Funa are some notable Monarchs while the Braves have had the likes of Chris Steele, DJ Uiagalelei, Jaiden Woodbey, Josh Rosen, Kourt Williams, Trent McDuffie and Wyatt Davis.

In 2019, Uiagalelei and Young shared the MaxPreps' National Player of the Year award while McCoy won it the year before and Daniels in 2017.

St. John Bosco has finished ranked in the Top 10 five consecutive years and was the 2019 MaxPreps National Champions while Mater Dei has finished ranked in the Top 10 four straight years and have finished either Nos. 1 or 2 in three consecutive seasons (2017, 2018, 2019).

With California moving football to the spring, the two powers weren't included in the MaxPreps Top 25, but there are still plenty of implications when the Braves and Monarchs meet on April 17. There's a good chance the winner will head into next season ranked No. 1.

These are the top two teams in the California Top 25 rankings and the last time they squared off Uiagalelei led the Braves to a wild 39-34 win in the CIF Southern Section Division 1 championship. The five-star quarterback threw for 446 yards and five touchdowns.

Beaux Collins, Cristian Dixon and Jaylin Davies are notable players who opted out of the spring season so they could enroll early in college, but these two programs still boast a ton of talent. There will be 61 players on the field that are either rated as a three-star recruit or higher on 247Sports composite rankings or have at least one FBS offer. 

NOTE: Rankings are based off 247Sports composite list
Raesjon Davis, Mater Dei
Photo by Heston Quan
Raesjon Davis, Mater Dei
Mater Dei (30)

Class of 2021 (9)

Four stars (2)

OLB — Raesjon Davis | 6-1 | 215 | USC
No. 48 overall | No. 4 outside linebacker | No. 3 in California

WR — Kyron Ware-Hudson | 6-1 | 200 | USC
No. 126 overall | No. 22 wide receiver | No. 11 in California

Three stars (7)

RB — Marceese Yetts | 5-8 | 165 | Air Force
No. 1,007 overall | No. 10 all-purpose back | No. 83 in California

OG — Ross Maseuli | 6-2 | 350 | San Diego State
No. 1,019 overall | No. 52 offensive guard | No. 84 in California

C — George Miki-Han | 5-11 | 300 | Colorado State
No. 1,584 overall | No. 20 center | No. 135 in California

DE — Tyler Narayan | 6-1 | 255 | Navy
No. 1,933 overall | No. 111 strong-side defensive end | No. 158 in California

ATH — Champion Johnson | 6-2 | 220 | Uncommitted
Has offers from Oregon and San Diego State

ATH — Shoes Brinkley | 5-9 | 185 | Uncommitted
Has 22 FBS offers led by Cincinnati, Coastal Carolina, Hawaii and Nevada.

OG — Terrance Caldwell | 6-2 | 290 | Cornell
Has 11 FBS offers, committed to Cornell on Dec. 8.

Class of 2022 (12)

Five stars (1)

CB — Domani Jackson | 6-1 | 185 | USC
No. 3 overall | No. 1 cornerback | No. 1 in California

Four stars (3)

RB — Raleek Brown | 5-8 | 185 | Oklahoma
No. 47 overall | No. 3 running back | No. 2 in California

WR — C.J. Williams | 6-2 | 195 | Uncommitted
No. 71 overall | No. 9 wide receiver | No. 7 in California

OLB — David Bailey | 6-3 | 220 | Uncommitted
No. 82 overall | No. 6 outside linebacker | No. 9 in California

Three stars (8)

ATH — Cooper Barkarte | 6-1 | 180 | Uncommitted
No. 407 overall | No. 38 athlete | No. 29 in California

OLB — Eoghan Kerry | 6-3 | 225 | Uncommitted
No. 640 overall | No. 42 outside linebacker | No. 47 in California

RB — Quincy Craig | 5-9 | 175 | Uncommitted
No. 753 overall | No. 58 running back | No. 52 in California

CB — Josh Hunter | 5-9 | 165 | Uncommitted
No. 910 overall | No. 88 cornerback | No. 65 in California

CB — Cameron Sidney | 5-10 | 160 | Uncommitted
No. 925 overall | No. 92 cornerback | No. 66 in California

ILB — Malaki Te'o | 6-1 | 225 | Uncommitted
No. 929 overall | No. 32 inside linebacker | No. 70 in California

ATH — Tanner Salisbury | 6-1 | 200 | Uncommitted
Has 11 FBS offers led by Colorado, Fresno State, San Diego State and San Jose State.

DT — Sione Moa
No. 89 defensive tackle | No. 131 in California

Class of 2023 (2)

Four stars (1)

ILB — Leviticus Su'a | 6-1 | 210 | Uncommitted
No. 90 overall | No. 3 inside linebacker | No. 7 in California

Three stars (1)

OG — BJ Tolo | 6-1 | 290 | Uncommitted
Has offers from Colorado State, Kansas and Oregon.

Class of 2024 (7)

DL — Aydin Breland | 6-5 | 315 | Uncommitted
Has offers from Arizona State, Colorado, Kansas, Oregon and USC.

QB — Elijah Brown | 6-2 | 180 | Uncommitted
Has an offer from Pittsburgh.

DB — Zabien Brown | 6-1 | 165 | Uncommitted 
Has six FBS offers led by Michigan, Penn State and USC.

OL — DeAndre Carter | 6-6 | 345 | Uncommitted
Has an offer from USC.

OLB — Ramere Davis | 6-1 | 190 | Uncommitted
Has six FBS offers led by Florida State, Michigan and Oregon.

WR — Jack Ressler | 5-10 | 180 | Uncommitted
Has offers from Arizona, Arizona State, Hawaii and Pittsburgh.

DL — Kaho Tuihalamaka | 6-5 | 360 | Uncommitted
Has offers from Arizona State and Oklahoma State.
Maximus Gibbs, St. John Bosco
Photo by Heston Quan
Maximus Gibbs, St. John Bosco
St. John Bosco (31)

Class of 2021 (5)

Three stars (5)

OG — Maximus Gibbs | 6-6 | 385 | USC
No. 905 overall | No. 46 offensive guard | No. 73 in California

OLB — Andrew Simpson | 6-1 | 220 | Kansas
No. 1,144 overall | No. 72 outside linebacker | No. 92 in California

WR — Jode McDuffie | 5-10 | 170 | Sacramento State
No. 1,188 overall | No. 172 wide receiver | No. 96 in California

DE — Ieremia Moore | 6-3 | 265 | California
No. 1,220 overall | No. 79 strong-side defensive end | No. 98 in California

OG — Edward Riley | 5-11 | 265 | Uncommitted
No. 117 offensive guard | No. 238 in California

Class of 2022 (14)

Four stars (4)

OG — Earnest Greene | 6-4 | 330 | Uncommitted
No. 59 overall | No. 2 offensive guard | No. 3 in California

RB — Rayshon Luke | 5-8 | 160 | Uncommitted
No. 184 overall | No. 1 all-purpose back | No. 12 in California

DE — Nathan Burrell | 6-2 | 250 | Uncommitted
No. 332 overall | No. 20 weak-side defensive end | No. 23 in California

S — Sione Hala | 6-2 | 190 | Uncommitted
No. 333 overall | No. 20 safety | No. 24 in California

Three stars (10)

CB — Tayvion Beasley | 5-10 | 165 | Uncommitted
No. 419 overall | No. 39 cornerback | No. 30 in California

OLB — Jalen Woods | 6-0 | 210 | Uncommitted
No. 435 overall | No. 33 outside linebacker | No. 32 in California

QB — Katin Houser | 6-3 | 200 | Boise State
No. 483 overall | No. 21 pro-style quarterback | No. 36 in California

RB — Jabari Bates | 5-8 | 160 | Uncommitted
No. 793 overall | No. 59 running back | No. 53 in California

DT — Jairus Satele | 5-11 | 300 | Uncommitted
No. 1,000 overall | No. 69 defensive tackle | No. 74 in California

RB — Michael Hayes | 5-8 | 165 | Uncommitted
No. 1,104 overall | No. 82 running back | No. 86 in California

S — Jaxon Harley | 5-9 | 165 | Uncommitted
No. 1,137 overall | No. 73 safety | No. 90 in California

WR — Jaceon Doss | 6-0 | 180 | Uncommitted
Has offers from Kansas and Pittsburgh.

WR — Logan Booher | 6-2 | 200 | Uncommitted
Has offers from Brown and Kansas.

DT — Malachi Finau | 6-4 | 275 | Uncommitted
Has an offer from Kansas.

Class of 2023 (8)

Four stars (3)

ATH — Matayo Uiagalelei | 6-6 | 265 | Uncommitted
No. 15 overall | No. 2 weak-side defensive end | No. 3 in California

QB — Pierce Clarkson | 6-0.5 | 205 | Uncommitted
No. 171 overall | No. 4 dual-threat quarterback | No. 12 in California

ATH — Jahlil McClain | 5-10 | 180 | Uncommitted
No. 238 overall | No. 26 athlete | No. 21 in California

Three stars (5)

WR — Raiden Brown | 5-10 | 150 | Uncommitted
Has an offer from Arizona State.

LB — Deven Bryant | 6-1 | 210 | Uncommitted
Has an offer from Oregon.

S — Ty Lee | 6-3 | 190 | Uncommitted
Has offers from Arizona State and University of Southern California.

RB — Nygel Osborne | 5-9 | 160 | Uncommitted
Has offers from Arizona State and Colorado.

OL — Mosiah Talanoa | 6-3 | 350 | Uncommitted
Has an offer from Florida Atlantic University.

Class of 2024 (4)

ATH — Jordan Lockhart | 6-3 | 190 | Uncommitted
Has an offer from Maryland.

ILB — Kyngstonn Viliamu-Asa | 6-2 | 205 | Uncommitted
Has seven FBS offers led by Michigan and Oregon.

CB — Marcelles Williams | 5-11 | 170 | Uncommitted
Has 10 FBS offers led by Arizona State, Florida State, Michigan, Oregon and USC.

S — Peyton Woodyard | 6-1 | 175 | Uncommitted
Has 10 FBS offers led by Arizona State, Florida State, Michigan, Penn State and USC.